Always Under Promise. Always Over Deliver

Posted on March 14, 2014

When a client asks you to create a timeline for a project, you always under promise and over deliver.

Even though you might be a speed racer and could potentially get everything done tomorrow, you always want to give yourself more time to allow for the unexpected. What if something else pops up on another account? What if the project takes longer than you think? What if you get sick? You always want to make sure to give yourself some wiggle room and manage your client’s expectations properly. I’d rather you send a knockout amazing project back to the client on the day you said you would than email him one day early. The issue with emailing early is that you are setting the expectation that you do things one day early. The client might expect you to continue getting things done “early” for the next few assignments. Hold yourself to your word. Meet your own deadlines. Do what you say you are going to do. No need to over promise. Just make sure to under promise and deliver like a rock star.


3 comments
shaynadunitz
shaynadunitz

This is so important - my tendency is to want to say YES, I CAN DO THAT RIGHT NOW, but it's not always feasible or the best course of action. I have to continuously think before I answer requests so I can deliver the best results for our clients. 

laceynygard
laceynygard

Completely agree with sending projects early. A great reminder that it's not good to set expectations that you'll always finish things in advance... you never know what's going to happen! 

LindseyDay
LindseyDay

Love this principle! This is something I learned "the hard way" early in my career. "You always want to give yourself more time to allow for the unexpected." -- so true!!